Expressing my view!

Sharing with whoever would read my thoughts

The rights of a gay person are human rights.

This is a letter to the editor of Stabroek News, a daily newspapers in Guyana, in response to a letter to the editor by Abu Bakr, published on Sunday, Mar 14, 2010.

Dear Editor:

The letter published by Abu Bakr in your Sunday, Mar 14 edition deserves a direct response. It is unfortunate that this discussion has degenerated into a sexualizing of the issues. I am taking a stand for the human rights denied Mark and many like him who have no voice, or whose voices are drowned out in the cacophony of denial. There are many who have fled the country, such as Vermal from Soesdyke, whose story of sexual abuse, taunted, beaten and imprisoned in his home, was turned into a play performed on stages around the U.S., or those who still suffer in silence, forced to conform and dare not speak up. If Bakr and Williams are standing on preserving a homophobic and bigoted status quo, then I hope they realize the tenuousness of their position.

While Bakr’s letter contains numerous flaws, his arguments are illogical and inconsistent. There are two glaring non sequitur arguments. First, he stated that instead of apportioning blame to the community or the stepfather for Mark’s demise, that I should be held responsible and submit to guilt. Aside from being absurd, Mark came to see me for compassion, understanding and acceptance. Had I retreated behind a wall of dogma and fundamentalism, he would have been let down by at least one more person he trusted. With the altruism that Christianity calls forth from each of us, would I not be betraying him by asking him to deny himself and to embrace something that is against his nature, how is accepting yourself an “inversion of values”? The story of Mark, the pathos and the emotive aspects associated with it was intended to illustrate the point, that as one case, it was an exercise in compassion and acceptance, when the community and society had failed, and the ultimate tragic consequences. Also, if at the time I was aspiring to a deeper Christian way of life, how hypocritical would I be, that in my formation, I could not extend the compassion, understanding and acceptance that Jesus practiced and advocated to the marginalized of society, of which gays and lesbians are confined? Is Bakr implying that, as with many who profess one thing and do another, in that period of formation; I should squander my authenticity?

Despite the abuses and the negativity of those who preach or act in the name of Christianity, a friend, a deceased priest, once said that each person is called to strive for and achieve greatness. Bakr correctly suggests that I am inviting Guyanese to progress rather than to be lagging behind the rest of the world. And, to bring relevance to this discussion, since Guyanese are descendants of Africans, the examples of the struggles for rights and the violence against gays in Africa, ought to expand otherwise myopic or provincial views. Bakr claims a “gay militancy,” when is a call for acceptance and inclusion of human nature a militancy and not a human right? With the advances in gay rights, which several countries have recognized as synonymous with human rights and enacted appropriate laws to enshrine those rights, and with progress in Guyana, however little there is, is Bakr so jaded or disillusioned to the human condition to warrant such absolute denial?

UN Secretray General Ban Ki-Moon

Keeping to the aspirations of a better human condition, to which we are all called, in the context of global HIV and AIDS, in which many gays and lesbians are affected, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, on World AIDS Day last December, called on member countries to decriminalize homosexuality, “This goal can be achieved only if we shine the full light of human rights on HIV. That means countering any form of HIV-related stigma and discrimination… I urge all countries to remove punitive laws, policies and practices… In many countries, legal frameworks institutionalize discrimination against groups most at risk…”

Second, Bakr sought to draw comparisons to Africa, by saying that 29 countries on the continent outlawed homosexuality. He does not develop his argument or refute the evidence that homosexuality was practiced and accepted as part of the traditions before the colonialists arrived. He trundles out a list of countries, whose governments facing their respective crises, have chosen instead to demonize or pick on the vulnerable, and have declared that homosexuality is alien to the continent, and then undermines himself, “The ethnographic evidence contradicts their assertion.” He also confirms the position that India accepts homosexuality, inclusive of inter-sexism. However, the point he misses is that homosexuality exists in human nature and as a member of a civilized society he is denying acceptance and recognition, not as one commentator, F. Skinner, suggests, to suppress it.

David Kuria Mbote, director of the Gay and Lesbian Coalition of Kenya, in an opinion “You can’t wish away African gays,” published on Mar 10 in the Daily Nation, a Kenyan publication, responded to an article written by Fr. Dominic Waweru, published on Mar 8, in which he said that the attacks on young people on suspicion of being gay was “only too comprehensible”. In his article Mbote said, “It should be noted that compulsory heterosexuality has never converted any one from homosexuality, but in the context of modern diseases, the African community continues to place itself in a curiously unintelligent position. By affirming what is globally known to be an alternative and legitimate form of sexual expression for a minority within any population to be unAfrican, they are saying that the African falls beyond the ambit of what is human. Instead of giving tacit approval to violence against gays, churches should be in the forefront preaching reconciliation and love to even those who they regard as “sinners”. Gay rights activism has reached a point of no return even in Africa, events in Malawi, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Zambia, and Mtwapa notwithstanding. It’s unfortunate that the Church stands at the vanguard for this extremely unjust violation of rights of gays, lesbians, transgender and intersex Kenyans.”

Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Two days later, the distinguished Nobel laureate Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa in an opinion article “In Africa, a step backward on human rights” published on Mar 12, in the Washington Post, said clearly, “Hate has no place in the house of God. No one should be excluded from our love, our compassion, or our concern because of race or gender, faith or ethnicity — or because of their sexual orientation…In my country of South Africa, we struggled for years against the evil system of apartheid that divided human beings, children of the same God, by racial classification and then denied many of them fundamental human rights. We knew this was wrong. Thankfully, the world supported us in our struggle for freedom and dignity. It is time to stand up against another wrong. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered people are part of so many families. They are part of the human family. They are part of God’s family. And of course they are part of the African family. But a wave of hate is spreading across my beloved continent. People are again being denied their fundamental rights and freedoms.”

Addressing the wrongs committed against gays and lesbians in African countries, the Archbishop said, “That this pandering to intolerance is being done by politicians looking for scapegoats for their failures is not surprising. But it is a great wrong. An even larger offense is that it is being done in the name of God. Show me where Christ said, “Love thy fellow man, except for the gay ones.” Gay people, too, are made in my God’s image. I would never worship a homophobic God… My scientist and medical friends have shared with me a reality that so many gay people have confirmed, I now know it in my heart to be true. No one chooses to be gay. Sexual orientation, like skin color, is another feature of our diversity as a human family. Isn’t it amazing that we are all made in God’s image, and yet there is so much diversity among his people? Does God love his dark- or his light-skinned children less? The brave more than the timid? And does any of us know the mind of God so well that we can decide for him who is included, and who is excluded, from the circle of his love?”

Bakr, Williams and those who share repressive views would do well to remember that Guyana’s buggery laws, which are part of the Penal Code, were enacted in colonial days and remain unchanged, even though Guyana achieved independence and republic status with its own constitution, which guarantees the rights and protections of all its citizens. On Mar 11, the U.S. State Department released its annual human rights report, “Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity References, Human Rights Reports for 2009, 2009 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.” In the introduction, against the backdrop of the 2009 Anti-homosexuality bill pending in the Ugandan Parliament, the report referred to the 1950’s colonial law against homosexuality, which the Ugandan High Court in December 2008 ruled as unconstitutional and that the rights of all persons are protected. This is a report that advises other nations, companies, and individuals of the quality of human rights in a particular country, so that appropriate decisions could be made regarding the level or degree of involvement, including investment, in that country. On Guyana the report says, “Sodomy is punishable with a maximum sentence of life in prison. There are no laws concerning female-to-female sex. On September 18, Health Minister Leslie Ramsammy publicly called for a Caribbean-wide discussion on the laws, stating that “many homosexuals suffer because of the stigma and discrimination attached” to their sexual orientation.”

Against these undeniable truths, what would Bakr, Williams and the others now say?

Respectfully,

Antoine Craigwell

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March 16, 2010 - Posted by | African-American News, Black Gay Men, Black Gay Men Health, Black Men, Black Men Health, Blogroll, Caribbean, community, death, Guyana, Health, HIV, HIV Status, Jamaica, LGBT community, Male Health, Politics, Public Health

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